“In life, as in art, the beautiful moves in curves.” Edward G Bulwer-Lytton

It is the function of art to renew our perception. What we are familiar with we cease to see. The writer shakes up the familiar scene, and, as if by magic, we see a new meaning in it. Anais Nin

Seeing the familiar with new eyes takes much practice.  Being able to step out of our familiar perceptions of things, people, ourselves and look with new eyes at the world around and within us is a challenge. It can be an uncomfortable challenge.  We may not like the new perspective we gain on the world or ourselves.  But we also have an opportunity to see old things with new joy.

The  magnolia petals in this shot seem to hold the essence of the flower within their curves, promising protection but at the same time, hiding the beauty at the heart of the magnolia.

In photography, as in writing and in life, we need to be able to see beyond the external into the heart and the essence of what we look at.  If we do not look for the essence, we will forever be looking at the external, the familiar, believing that we know all there is to know, because we are so familiar with it.  We can learn nothing new when we look into the mirror, or the flower or around us.  But the essence is not seen in one glance.  We have to part the curves of the petals, open the curving armour around our being, see beyond the curving horizon of our world to find  new perspectives.

Each day is a challenge to look for the new perspective.  With a camera at my eye, I can look into the hearts of flowers, see the spider webs hidden beneath the bark or catch the craters on the moon.   When these images appear on my computer, they stun and delight me.  They teach me that what I see with my ‘normal’ eyes is such a small part of what there is.

Finding a camera for my soul is more difficult.

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